Comments
Data Science Drives Retail Testing
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Re: Recognizing testing
  • 7/23/2014 8:00:17 AM
NO RATINGS

@kq4ym. Good question about whether the data folks are also measuring customer satisfaction. I've notice a real uptick in the number of retailers including links to online surveys on their receipts. It's the old "have a chance to win $100 in groceries" promo. I rarely, if ever, follow up online. I wonder if that's where they are measuring satisfaction, and how many participants they need to get reliable data.

Re: Recognizing testing
  • 7/23/2014 7:25:46 AM
NO RATINGS

I see that too, but I assumed it was less about math and more about round numbers and people liking to see things in whole numbers.  If something is listed at $1.66 and it's something you may go through quickly or would buy multiples of in the first place but right next to it is a competitor's product at 3 for $5 I know which one I would pick up because I like whole numbers.

Re: Recognizing testing
  • 7/23/2014 7:22:20 AM
NO RATINGS

I think in some cases it does work.  I do tend to see people standing there looking at things but they all seem to be impulse items and I'm not that type of shopper.  I go in knowing what I need and  I don't browse.  For me it makes me wish there was a store closer to home that wasn't so chopped up because I would go there just to avoid feeling like a mouse in a maze.

Re: Recognizing testing
  • 7/22/2014 5:22:05 PM
NO RATINGS

One of the pricing tests that seems to be going on at our Florida supermarket is lots of confusing 3 for $5.00 or other oddball ways to price that cannot be easy to figure what the real price of one is without a calculator. It's been going on for quite a long time, so the data guys must have figured that it's good for the bottom line. I wonder if they're also measuring customer satisfaction as well?

Re: Recognizing testing
  • 7/22/2014 10:41:52 AM
NO RATINGS

@SaneIT. I wonder if anyone has data to show whether the "confusing" store layout really works. I understand why they do it, hoping that people will do impulse buys while they walk through sections they think they don't care about. But does the data show that people do buy more under those circumstances? Do they buy enough to offset the lost sales when those of us -- like me -- storm out of the store because we can't find what we came in for. Where's the myth? What's the reality?

I guess the same applies to the practice of flooding the store with aggressive sales people. I've noticed that the big-box home supply stores are employing that tactic of late. There's a helpful clerk at every turn, "Can I help you find anything?" Does it help sales? Hurt?

 

Recognizing testing
  • 7/22/2014 7:39:56 AM
NO RATINGS

Do you visit a redesigned store just because it looks fresh?

No, in general I go where I know I can get what I need.  I will say though that walking into a store where things have moved is incredibly irritating.  Once you get used to walking the path to a specific area and they remove that path it's like a scavenger hunt.  It's even worse when the signage is bad or non-existent.  I can think of one local retailer who did this about a year ago.  It still annoys me when I go there because they cut off the nice quick paths to the areas I normally go and they blocked the way with things I never give more than a glance to as I'm walking around the blockade.

Do you have trouble navigating a new menu at a favorite restaurant?

I have run into this a couple times.  I will say that the best redesigns are the ones that keep some older dishes so that it's easy to recognize what section of the menu you are in without reading it like a book.  There is a small restaurant locally that has a 4 page menu that changes somewhat frequently and the pages get put in different orders depending on which physical menu you pick up.  It can be funny sometimes when someone asks what you are ordering and the two of you start flipping through two very different menus trying to find a matching page.

 

Do you respond to targeted pricing offers? 

Almost always no.  I don't do impulse buying, it's just not in my nature.  A funny story from a recent trip to a pharmacy as we were checking out the cashier asked if I wanted to a couple packs of gum and gave a little pitch that was something like "Do you need gum, 3 packs for $2, that's 66 cents a pack..." I cut him off at that point and told him no thank you.  My daughter who was with me said "ssh, Dad, he's selling".  It made me proud seeing my kids recognize a sales pitch.

 



INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +