Comments
Cloud Encounters of the Fifth Kind
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Re: Clouds of robots?
  • 7/31/2014 10:49:25 PM
NO RATINGS

..

Leo writes


I've heard what you are describing called the "Star Trek" economy, where a small number of robots, automated factories and 'replicators' can make nearly all the 'stuff' we might need, perhaps owned by a small number of individuals, leaving the other 99% to do what exactly as a job to earn money to buy that 'stuff'?  Personally I think that's out even beyond my grandchildren's generation, and if we manage to survive climate change and nuclear disasters there will be time for politics, culture and economics to evolve and adapt.  Because in the long run, if it doesn't work for the 99%, then society will not be stable enough for anyone.


 

Well put. This is pretty much what I've been trying to argue back to my friend...

 

Re: Clouds of robots?
  • 7/30/2014 5:21:30 PM
NO RATINGS

I really had to hold myself back from going too far with this post by working Skynet into it.  But I had some of the same thoughts.  What I don't buy into is Ray Kurtzweil's vision of the Singularity (augmented humanity) by 2050 - I think we are much, much further away from both strong AI and a sufficient understanding of the human nervous system / brain / consciousness. 

If you consider that Services now make up about 70% of a modern economy, with manufacturing, mining, construction and agriculture under 30%, there's not that much left for the robots to displace, considering that until the robots start making themselves we'll at least need lots of robot manufacturers and robot maintenance techs.

I've heard what you are describing called the "Star Trek" economy, where a small number of robots, automated factories and 'replicators' can make nearly all the 'stuff' we might need, perhaps owned by a small number of individuals, leaving the other 99% to do what exactly as a job to earn money to buy that 'stuff'?  Personally I think that's out even beyond my grandchildren's generation, and if we manage to survive climate change and nuclear disasters there will be time for politics, culture and economics to evolve and adapt.  Because in the long run, if it doesn't work for the 99%, then society will not be stable enough for anyone.

Re: Clouds of robots?
  • 7/30/2014 10:33:14 AM
NO RATINGS

@Lyndon thanks for reminding me about the dangers in space and how we narrowly avoid many here on Earth. :) 

Re: Clouds of robots?
  • 7/30/2014 8:00:06 AM
NO RATINGS

..

TinyM writes


 I don't look forward to the trouble it may cause when traffic is jammed up or all the things are attacked by malware.


 

And then there are those darn coronal mass ejections...

 

Re: Clouds of robots?
  • 7/29/2014 11:54:48 PM
NO RATINGS

@Lyndon The idea that we could be 'inefficient, squishable, stupid and mortals' in the future doesn't sound good. What happened to the amazing human brain that invented the machinery in the first place? Could it be that evolution took place and parts like our human brain shrunk because it wasn't used anymore?

Re: Clouds of robots?
  • 7/29/2014 10:50:56 PM
NO RATINGS

I'm lookng forward the utility Internet where all sorts of things are connected and sending data back and forth. I don't look forward to the trouble it may cause when traffic is jammed up or all the things are attacked by malware.

Clouds of robots?
  • 7/29/2014 4:30:07 PM
NO RATINGS

..

Leo writes


A couple of years have passed since reaching the point where more than half of all web traffic became non-human and is mostly search engines, bots, and spam. But when it comes to the Internet as a whole, video and media/gaming still hold sway at more than 50% of the transmitted bits. The peer-to-peer segment currently comprises about 20% of the total, largely dominated by file sharing and financial trading, but masked within it is the fastest growing component: machine-to-machine (M2M). M2M traffic is expected to grow by more than an order of magnitude within just the next five years. When it comes to the Internet of Things (IOT), the future clearly belongs to the Things. ...

Arthur's digital economy continues to build out its nervous system, with the Things of the Internet not just talking to each other, but learning as they go -- they are taking over this conversation, and they don't care whether it's cloudy or not.


 

This seems uncomfortably close to the vision of a pal of mine, who foresees a future of robots communicating with robots, running everything, with no role for us inefficient, squishable, stupid, mortal humans.

My pal sees intelligent robots as our "children". That notion seems a bit creepy for me, but is this where M2M and IOT are headed?

Just wondering...

 



INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +