Comments
Will California Dry Up & Fall Off?
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Re: Trees have genes.
  • 10/14/2015 6:37:18 AM
NO RATINGS

Imagine trees having furniture made from human bones... that's what we do to trees. Now regarding the drought, it is artificially made by humans, the more toxic chemicals (chemtrails) "they" spray up in the sky in the form of "persistent contrails", (special additives to jet fuel as well as spraying from separate tanks on board) the more there will be droughts, dead trees, dead bees, Alzheimer's, nervous system damage etc. etc.

Trees have genes.
  • 4/23/2015 10:33:48 AM
NO RATINGS

Trees have genes that ensure annual water supply for its life.They ensure adequate rainfall in their vicinity. One single tree may fail but a 1000 trees will certainly succeed.Plant trees in California,you have the vast ocean to your west.Evaporation takes place over this ocean.A forest with 1000 trees will have ground temperature difference of more than 10deg C.The water vapor will move from sea to the 1000 trees.Precipitaion will take place.The 1000 trees will quench their thirst and leave abundant water for its siblings.Man came after the trees on earth.

Re: Cali's Rain
  • 2/4/2015 5:41:44 PM
NO RATINGS

dont let the yellow patch distract from the variability in the data. between 1100-1400 (assuming the data is in fact correct), accelerations were more pronounced than recent ones. This was much before the industrial revolution and everything that is associated with it, such as pollution, population explosion, etc.

Long Term Aridity in the Western US
  • 12/19/2014 3:23:07 PM
NO RATINGS

For people who love data - here is the climate data showing that the Western US has been wetter during the last 100 years than for long periods of time in the not-too distant past (red line) - 

Long Term Aridity in the Western US

Re: Cali's Rain
  • 12/19/2014 10:30:21 AM

@ecovivekananda. Thanks for joining the conversation. I grew up in a farmtown, so I know there are things about their land and the weather that farmers just "know" even if they can't explain it. I think what science can bring to the table is information that supplements but doesn't replace that farmer's institutional knowledge.

For example, I'll bet that every farmer knows how to keep most of their soil healthy, whether in terms of nutrients, acidity or water. Yet, there's always that one patch or that one field that just doesn't respond to their efforts. Sensors, analytics, and new types of seeds can help them make that 10 or 20 percent of their property more productive. Or, science might show them that instead of having entire fields lie fallow for a season -- to rest after a couple of years of wheat or corn production -- there are other crops that not only won't tax the soil in the same ways but will actually feed the soil while also providing an alternative cash crop.

To keep science in perspective, let's think of it as supplemental knowledge.

Re: Cali's Rain
  • 12/18/2014 10:13:22 PM
NO RATINGS
1 saves

In Maharashtra in INDIA, farmers have a time proven way to analyse the observations of mango crop and successfully predict when the next good crop will appear.     Scientists therefore need to factor even what they do not understand in their equations.    The farmer may not know the theory but it works for him.    It is not unreasonable to say that we do not know everything.

Re: Cali's Rain
  • 12/10/2014 10:57:22 PM
NO RATINGS

@PredictableChaos, why your point about the timescale of climate is spot-on, one nuance you're leaving out is that of acceleration ... as in, what's important is how fast climate changes. Weather always changes, but if you get caught in a period of rapid change (whether from some long-term cosmic cycle or from mad-made causes), LOOK OUT! 

Re: Cali's Rain
  • 9/2/2014 1:57:16 PM

This summer was mild and cool in many parts of the Southern US. 

However, as the 1000-year data shows, the trends aren't evident in one or two years. Even 10 or 15 years can easily be different from the long term trend. In weather data, most of what happens in human time-scales is simply noise.

The only thing we can count on with weather, in the 1500s or today, is that it will be change.

Re: Cali's Rain
  • 9/2/2014 8:20:16 AM
NO RATINGS

Hmm ... that would be interesting to see!

Re: Cali's Rain
  • 8/31/2014 11:35:15 PM

It's interesting that even with all the data and technology we have access to we still listen to the Farmers Almanac! Now where is the analysis with the actual vs.the Almanac.

Page 1 / 3   >   >>


INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +