Comments
The Downside of Making Data Go Poof
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Re: Data that shall never die
  • 10/10/2014 2:59:25 PM
NO RATINGS

@ Hospice. from my experience a judge usually gives preference to what ever is in writing. Hopefully any lawyer wouldn't risk their career by submitting false documents. 

Re: Data that shall never die
  • 9/1/2014 10:59:09 PM
NO RATINGS

..

Hospice asks


If the security and privacy issues as well as the political implications are resolved or mitigated, should we still be concerned that our data be stored "forever" ?


 

If all those issues get "resolved", why would they still be storing this data? Besides, as long as there's somebody's private data to be available to somebody, how much of the "privacy" issue is really resolved? 

Anyway, nobody's rushing to resolve or even mitigate this situation anytime soon. The spooks are still sucking it all up and storing it, and the data warehouse space is growing as we speak.

 

Re: Data that shall never die
  • 8/31/2014 11:10:01 PM
NO RATINGS

"But even then, if the company doesn't have documents, and the person suing them does, well that' s not good. "

In this case, what if the company denies the authensity of the documents? Will the person suing them still have a valid case?

Re: Data that shall never die
  • 8/31/2014 1:00:38 AM
NO RATINGS

Re: " A spokesman said not to worry though, you can still wade through the paper copies rather than doing an online search."   Recently I was working with a financial analyactical company and when through hundreds of PDF's and coverting them back to electronic data.  Mind numbing after a while. Full blown processing, review and production can have a litigation cost of $2.70 to $4.00 per document. (Degnan D. Accounting for the Costs of Electronic Discovery. Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology. 2011;12(1):151-190.)

It isn't just about how old a document is, but how exposed is it to litigiation. Fiancial documents should be held longer.  Documents regarding company explotation of resources and research might be held on for longer.  It is a conversation that IT and the company's legal department should be having.

If a company goes to court and the data has been deleted, it should have a defensible data deletion policy.  This XYZ data was 10 years old and deleted along with all this other data on date XYZ.  If a company is consistent with it, it should be in the clear on that point.  But even then, if the company doesn't have documents, and the person suing them does, well that' s not good.

 

Re: Data that shall never die
  • 8/30/2014 3:15:33 PM
NO RATINGS

@Lydon_Henry,

If the security and privacy issues as well as the political implications are resolved or mitigated, should we still be concerned that our data be stored "forever" ?

Re: The dog ate my hard drive
  • 8/29/2014 7:24:20 AM
NO RATINGS

The email issue is a weak one, one way I can think that email messages might not exist on a server but would be saved only on a client PC would be a POP connection and intentionally setting the client to delete the server side messages after it has downloaded them.  I'm sure it happens some places but I would also hope that the team managing the servers are storing messages somewhere on the side as well.

Data that shall never die
  • 8/28/2014 4:26:01 PM
NO RATINGS

..

As Jim writes, "... that idea of reviewing files, consolidating them for future reference, and destroying the rest makes too much sense."

... Which sorta relates to an issue that makes me wonder. There we have the NSA (and who knows which other security agencies?) vacuuming up all kinds of Internet, cellphone, landline, and other communications, and storing them all, presumably forever, in an expanding arsenal of data warehouses in Utah and various other places. Why store it all forever? Well, they argue, they may need them someday to cross-reference with other information or communications associated with all these tens of millions of people they've already collected this data about.

So Jim's take on the data storage issue makes me wonder whether anybody has considered the storage implications (leaving aside the privacy and political implications) of accumulating this steadily exploding mini-universe of digital records, trivial mixed with dangerous, for which no end, ever, is envisioned ...

 

Re: The dog ate my hard drive
  • 8/28/2014 9:33:16 AM
NO RATINGS

I'm all for keeping everything but do realize the hazards and costs that may be involved (although going down everyday hopefully.) I'm not sure the court problem is as big as folks might believe. Judges use common sense when deciding what records "should" be there or not. And sanctions are pretty rare unless there's some blatant disregard for the court.

Re: The dog ate my hard drive
  • 8/28/2014 8:54:24 AM
NO RATINGS

@SaneIT. Sorry, that idea of reviewing files, consolidating them for future reference, and destroying the rest makes too much sense.

Seriously, great idea.

As far as the "dog ate my hard drive," it occurs to be to ask what email system only stores on the local drive? I've never worked on one that wasn't server hosted. And, how about the recipients of those emails? Might they have copies?  And, just so you know that the original saying isn't a lame excuse, I once did have to send a note to my daughter's teacher telling her that, yes, the dog did eat her homework. (Big dog, small brain)

 

Re: The dog ate my hard drive
  • 8/28/2014 7:33:32 AM
NO RATINGS

This brings up a good point.  There is a middle ground between holding on to everything and shredding it all.  Years ago I worked in the lending industry, obviously we had to keep records for years and we were very good at that.  When the day came to "destroy" documents because they aged out of the requirements we didn't just shred everything we had.  We had file clerks who went through files to consolidate as much as they could and we kept only the most important data.  Many times we could take a file that was hundreds of pages thick down to half or even a quarter of the physical size.  This meant that when people came back to us we weren't starting from zero and if we ever needed that information it existed in some form.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>


INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +