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Data Scientist Recruitment: Myth Busted
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Re: The real question...
  • 10/10/2014 3:07:22 PM
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@ Jamescon, I've heard of recruiters and temp agencies posting fake jobs on craiglist in order to get a bigger pool of resumes for their databases.  

This tidbit from an article named "Career Advice – How To Recognize Fake Job Ads"

"When I managed offices for a leading international recruiting firm, my offices were required to have a minimum number of jobs posted each week ... even if we didn't have enough current job orders. This requirement was audited as part of our offices' performance and reported all the way up to the President of the company.

In addition, even if we had job orders, we were required to post additional ads for "typical" jobs that we often filled ... even if there wasn't an immediate need for that specific job. Part of what drove this requirement was my company's relationship with CareerBuilder. My prior employer was one of CareerBuilder's largest advertisers and purchased an unlimited advertising package with them. So our corporate office encouraged (insisted on is a better description) fake job ads to drive a pipeline of candidate resumes to keep our inventory of candidates strong, maximizing their use of an unlimited package."

Re: My myth experience
  • 10/1/2014 12:38:56 PM
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@James: Methinks the unicorn search is actually the result of two distinct problems: thinking that is actually the best approach and not having the capability to search for the best (but not perfect) match. And, in both cases, such a search (other than relying on networks and referrals) can only find candidates if they are included in the data being searched.  

 

Re: The real question...
  • 9/30/2014 10:51:08 PM
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@chapAnjou, I have the sense that corporate recruiters and HR types still feel like they have to post their want ads in every venue, for fear of losing a candidate if they don't. All it takes, though, is one leader to stand up and question this practice based on the facts that: 1) this is a waste of time and resources; 2) real talented candidates for mid-level to higher end positions still predominantly come through "under the table" avenues (referrals, networks, etc.).

Re: My myth experience
  • 9/30/2014 6:20:18 PM
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@Dan. This search for unicorns -- not just in big data but in tech overall -- has been lingering for at least five years. I don't get it, hiring managers hire nobody while they wait for someone to come along with just the right language and data skills, team leadership experience, and deeper industry specific knowledge. I don't get it, they would have been better off hiring someone who fit 75% of the bill and working with them to fill in the rest. Of course, analytics, as you point out, isn't a place where you want one person to do it all but you need a team.

 

Re: My myth experience
  • 9/30/2014 4:49:44 PM
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I hate responding to this article's discussion with a recruitment ad, but I can't resist!

I didn't participate in the survey and highly question the generalizability of the findings. Yes, if one posts their resume in key places on the web, I can easily see how that could generate an enormous amount of mostly junk mail.

However, in my own 40 year career as an analyst, I never received a single recruitment contact that I felt was worth pursuing. The jobs weren't looking for the skills I had, weren't in industries or locations that I'd consider, didn't offer a better salary than my then current position and never identified the company or organization that was doing the hiring.

So, this past summer I created an alternative, AnalystFinder.com. You can read about it in a previous AllAnalytics' article (see: http://www.allanalytics.com/author.asp?section_id=1411&doc_id=273713 ). We haven't advertised the site until now as we've been busy all summer modifying the service so that it would be applicable for all analysts, not just SAS analysts (our sole original audience).

Wouldn't it be nice if you were only contacted regarding positions that actually called for skills and certifications that you have AND which matched your own job preferences (including areas you'd like to work, acceptable commuting distances and salary ranges)? And, if that's not enough, how about if the service was free AND let you know which company was doing the hiring AND never let the company know you were contacted unless you were interested in the specific position being offered AND came with the extra benefit of providing members of our database with otherwise unavailable aggregate summaries of our data (like actually reported average salaries, current hiring trends, and which skills are currently most in demand)?

Yes, I'd like you to become part of the AnalystFinder.com database but, equally important, I'd really appreciate your spreading the word by telling your colleagues and students about the service and commenting on, sharing and/or clicking that you like my recent LinkedIn update regarding AnalystFinder (https://www.linkedin.com/nhome/updates?activity=5918732962207133696&goback=&trk=hb_ntf_LIKED_UPDATE_YOU_CREATED).

Art

 

My myth experience
  • 9/30/2014 4:10:25 PM
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As a practicing data scientist who is fairly visible in the industry, my rate of recruiter contact is about 4 per week. Most of these jobs are repeats from variousl external recruiters trying to find candidates for the same job. Many times (I can even say most) the companies are seeking Unicorns so that's why the jobs have remained unfilled after 6 months, or even a year. The companies don't seem to learn that they need a "team" of data scientists with different skill-sets, most notably theory vs. engineering.

Re: The real question...
  • 9/30/2014 10:12:17 AM
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@chapAnjou:

" I find that most of the recruiters call out something specific in my profile and our conversations tend to be very interesting/exciting."

That is reassuring. Has any of these conversations ever translated into a concrete job offer? 

Re: The real question...
  • 9/30/2014 9:32:50 AM
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@Hospice,

If I'm on a job hunt, or just interested in testing the waters, I make sure to follow up and have a conversation with just about all of the recruiters that reach out to me that mention something specific from my profile.  If it's complete generic nonsense, I ignore them. I find that most of the recruiters call out something specific in my profile and our conversations tend to be very interesting/exciting.

Re: The real question...
  • 9/30/2014 9:30:54 AM
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@Broadway,

I think it's just the fact that LinkedIn took the concept of Facebook, catered it towards professionals and then created an interface that feels like a full resume that just makes it feel more professional.  So now, you can create this resume, interact with friends/colleagues/recruiters all in one spot and it all feels like your own thing.  Honestly, I'd be surprised if Monster was around in the next 5 yrs, unless they drastically improve the whole experience.

Re: The real question...
  • 9/29/2014 10:00:26 PM
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@chapAnjou: Thanks for the tips, but how did you know that the recruitment propositions were legit or not just generic emails?

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