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Data From on High Reshapes Our World View
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Re: Land vs.sky
  • 10/8/2014 9:57:24 AM
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@Beth I looked it up and found articles that show bell curves for the cost of hiring the surveyor. One claimed the max was $800 while the this one http://www.improvenet.com/r/costs-and-prices/land-survey-cost-estimator claimed the max is $900. I think that's just what you pay the surveyor for his services and there are likely filing fees with the town, as well. 

Re: Land vs.sky
  • 10/8/2014 8:19:26 AM
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Ariella, no, I don't know what it costs for traditional survey. When we've needed one, the original has always sufficed. If I recall correctly, even when we did an addition to the house the original plat was all we needed. I would have screamed if we had to pay for a new survey, and at such a high rate. Yikes.

Re: Land vs.sky
  • 10/8/2014 8:08:50 AM
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I'm a bit skeptical that a satellite survey of a home is going to be all that more accurate than the traditional ones. I'm thinking that the normal survey we all get for a few hundred dollars is very accurate already. A satellite view would have to be based on some land based measurements to begin with I think.

Re: Land vs.sky
  • 10/7/2014 5:48:31 PM
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"All I know is it's going to cost him something like $1,200 to get the property surveyed using satellite data -- and the company is coming out next week to take a look." 

@Beth do you have comparable figures for traditional surveying? We had to have a survey done when we bought our current house (as the one on file was considered out of date) and it cost somewhere around that amount 12 years ago.

Re: Early-warning data source?
  • 10/6/2014 10:35:30 AM
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Right, Beth... as we all know, if wishes were horses, well... then fools would would do analytics on horseback.

This same early warning system could be used for earthquakes and tsunamis; funding and management would probably have to be international. Practical? Maybe. Politically and fiscally problematic? Absolutely.

Re: Land vs.sky
  • 10/6/2014 10:30:39 AM
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Ha! I completely support Beth's neutral third-party stance; shooting with a GoPro might endanger her neutrality (among other things!).

Thanks for the update/tutorial on GPS accuracy. While I'd accept a +/- 1 cm variance, that approx 3/8" may mean the difference between a structure that will stand for years and having to tear something down.

Re: Land vs.sky
  • 10/6/2014 9:51:38 AM
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@Terry. I believe that caveat about GPS accuracy may be rooted in two things. First, is the old built-in 3-meter variance that the original civilian GPS gear came with, imposed by the military but since abandoned. The second thing is the warning that seems to come with everything these days, "Your results may vary." That is based on variances in quality of a particular device, atmospherics, etc. Topflight equipment in the right hands should bring GPS accuracy down to as fine as the centimeter level (or less). That's probably better than the accuracy rate of traditional surveyor equipment.

I think Beth could leverage technology in her own way in this situation. Post a couple of Go Pro cameras aimed at the two neighbors. She might get some great video if it turns into the Hatfields and McCoys.

 

Re: Early-warning data source?
  • 10/6/2014 8:57:46 AM
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Terry -- wouldn't that be ideal? A part of me finds research efforts of this sort fascinating while another part of me wishes the time and money would be spent toward projects that could effect the here and now. Understanding what's happening deep beneath a volcanic mountain's structure would be one of those, I think, to better assess when it will erupt. Might there be too many unknowns, however?

Re: Land vs.sky
  • 10/6/2014 8:37:23 AM
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Hi Terry, interesting note regarding the accuracy of GPS measurements. That wouldn't be useful in this situation, you're right, given we're talking about a typical city block with 10 feet between houses. From my understanding, this satellite plotting would deliver pinpoint accuracy, necessary to account for any discrepancies from any previous surveying that's been done or in relying on Google Maps, say, for a grid. I guess I'll have to do a little more digging around about the company they're sending out and its accuracy claims.

Early-warning data source?
  • 10/4/2014 1:08:13 PM
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After reading this, I'm also curious if any of this data could be used in real-time or near-real time applications for early warnings, especially after last weekend's horrific volcanic eruption on an otherwise quiet Japanese mountain, where 36 people perished.

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