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Midmarket Companies: Bring on the Big Data
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Re: Predicting the future
  • 10/13/2014 8:48:56 PM
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@ Beth, I think that would make for a very interesting study. "How aware are customers of  marketing analytics?"  I can't say for myself I can think of a time I felt positive about it.  Usually, it has some degree of a yuck factor for me.   However, how many times have I've been blissfully clueless, well I have no way of knowing. 

Re: Big data dubious
  • 10/13/2014 9:11:38 AM
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It coulld be the numbers aren't exact as pointed out. There's still a lot of fear involved in change. :CIOs often must wrest control of analytics back from lines of business that have circumvented them with big-data projects," being one obstacle. But being a bit nimbler, the midmarket folks should surely seriously consider the change to keep ahead of the competition before it's too late.

Re: Predicting the future
  • 10/11/2014 11:28:08 AM
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If predictive analytics is to have any future (at least in B2C realms), it's going to have to be subtle. Otherwise the "ick" factor will push customers away and undermine the loyalty that PA practitioners endeavor to cultivate.

Big data dubious
  • 10/11/2014 11:21:50 AM
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I don't know how much stock to put in these numbers, Beth. Seems like companies of all sizes (not to mention their managers and executives) are conditioned to bark like trained seals when the subject of big data arises. It's like excellent customer service; product/service quality, or hiringdiversity -- who's going to be against them?

But how many companies are really doing something with big data, beyond lip service? Dell's study doesn't really dig into that.

Re: Predicting the future
  • 10/10/2014 4:26:54 PM
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@Beth I agree. The customers should be surprised and pleased when they get the offer. It should be on target meeting a need they had, prompting them to purchase the company's product or service.

Re: Costs down
  • 10/10/2014 3:15:12 PM
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True again, Tom. Self-service tools are a good starting point, at least.

Re: Costs down
  • 10/10/2014 3:04:43 PM
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I also think that much of the software has become more intuitive and easier to use. This means less effort and cost for the smaller companies.

Re: Predicting the future
  • 10/10/2014 2:48:53 PM
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@Phoenix, I think the trick is subtlety -- customers shouldn't be able to tell a company has used predictive analytics to send along an offer, don't you think?

Re: Costs down
  • 10/10/2014 2:47:01 PM
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@tomsg, that's true -- especially, too, considering that there are many viable cloud analytics offerings midmarket companies can take advantage of as well.

Costs down
  • 10/9/2014 1:56:10 PM
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I think another factor in the interest of these mid-market companies is that the costs of solutions has come down. Not only does hardware continue to come down in price, but more competition has led to decreases in software costs as well. Couple this with more publicized results from big companies and more data scientists being trained and you have more resons for the surge in interest.

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