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Analytic Innovation & IP: Who Owns Your Ideas?
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Re: The Complicated Issue of IP
  • 10/13/2014 4:31:42 PM
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Good for you!

It is often difficult, but keep at it and you may find enough business to keep you busy, productive and - best of all - able to benefit from your own best ideas.

Re: The Complicated Issue of IP
  • 10/13/2014 4:20:18 PM
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Thanks Bryan !  I appreciate your support and that of the A2 community !    You guys are great !  : ) 

Re: The Complicated Issue of IP
  • 10/13/2014 4:15:05 PM
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Louis, that is great news!

Re: The Complicated Issue of IP
  • 10/13/2014 2:42:50 PM
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@PredictableChaos      I actually did form an LLC  last year.   I am an Engineer by trade whose background is Bus. Admin/MIS.    After years of working "freelance"  and knowing my own internal fire - it only made sense to move in this direction.   Now for the difficult part - to create a client based while still working in a traditional setting.

I will not lie - it is intimidating at times, but everyone who has started a business goes through this - so I am going to hang tough and eventually what doesn't make sense now will make cents later.

Re: The Complicated Issue of IP
  • 10/13/2014 11:53:34 AM
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@Louis - Have you ever thought about starting your own business, so there is no limit to your upside? So what makes sense, can also make cents?

Re: The Complicated Issue of IP
  • 10/12/2014 10:36:25 PM
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Preach! Unfortunately that is the irony. We are told that you have grid computing, big data, and point and click coding so go forth and innovate. But unless you can directly profit from your innovation and retain control of it (unless you choose to relinquish it) then why should you? You basically work within the parameters of your performance evaluation. You do your best work, but nothing beyond what you are being paid. It makes you wonder how many million dollar ideas never see the light of day. Totally agree - innovation does not make sense when it does not make cents.

The Complicated Issue of IP
  • 10/12/2014 7:36:19 PM
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To be blunt, this issue of IP ownership stifles internal innovation.  I know of colleagues who have created some really great things under the ceiling of a company that provided nothing more than electricity and an computer.

Created mind blowing techniques that could have earned them at least more than they were making.   I ask myself do I want to let my idea get swallowed up by a corporation that I am not heading?   I know the answer before I even ask the question; I do this mearly for the sake of discussion.

No.   Let me be a little more to the point, Absolutely not.    I personally do no more than is required to get through the pay period.  Oh and I know I am not alone.  Before I am stoned in the court of popular opinion, what really is my incentive ?   Everyone can ask themselves this question.  Well of course, there is none.  For better of worse I run my life as one would run a business.  I am a capitalist, profit is my motive so where there is no profit there is little effort or interest.  I know there are some who will say, How could you ?   And I would ask them the same question.   Keep the gold watch, I have bigger fish to fry.

It is too bad - the Law is as it is but I will never allow a company to make millions from an idea I created withiut the appropriate compensation.  And since we know that will never happen - neither will free innovation coming from me.   So I go about my day making "surface improvements", working often within the ill-logical confines set before me.   These surface improvements don't take much with most companies - as most are poorly managed.

 

And then I will call it a day.  I have been in the workplace long enough to no longer listen or believe in the "Rah Rah", "take one for the team mentality" that is just a bunch meaningless banter in the end.   

And of course, this is assuming I have any revolutionary ideas to begin with, which I don't. : )  

So as long as a company can commander  profits that come from my idea, there won't be any new ones coming from me.

 

Those will just have to wait until I can do it myself or not.   As for those who willing sign over their great ideas so companies can further profit as their expense, well we all have our reasons for things.   I don't judge them one way or another  and ironically it is how our economy has always been bulit.

Re: Who wants to own the IP
  • 10/12/2014 7:04:35 PM
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Really interesting issue - that of IP.    I think in the case that you mention Bryan, the student who received some assistance from his university probably cannot claim rights to anything that arises from the association.

I like the question of is it unique ?   If so you have a fighting chance otherwise, I would advise not thinking too far outside the box.

Re: Who wants to own the IP
  • 10/10/2014 3:32:12 PM
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@kq4ym my first thought was the same as yours - the commercial value of most patents is small. Let the school take on the real and up-front costs for an uncertain future benefit.

Also, as students, the mere fact of having your name on a patent is already a milestone.

The wrinkle is that the industry sponsor (not the college) has expressed interest in actually making something of this idea.

PC

 

Re: Who wants to own the IP
  • 10/10/2014 11:00:20 AM
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Although we are discussing the merits of innovation in the face of ownership as it relates to analytics, the same issues are seen in other industries. In looking at the basic four phases of economic activity (production, distribution, exchange and consumption), if an entity cannot produce a good or service, then they make money by controlling access to the distribution chain. I think this was the basis of Prince's dispute with Warner Brothers years ago. He changed his name to 'The Artist Formerly Known as Prince' and started releasing music through the internet; he was losing money because he did not control the distribution rights to his music. In like fashion, I would encourage our young professionals to ensure that you not only control the work products of your intellectual activity, but also the distribution rights. That is basically what this college is telling PC's daughter and friends - either split the pie or risk getting no pie. What bothers me about this is that these are kids. The college is already getting tuition - now they are acting as parasites on their dreams as well? Yeah, they may have to collaborate with the school on this one but hopefully they will get smarter going forward.

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