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Store First & Ask Questions Later
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Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/27/2014 11:39:48 AM
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@Jamescon,

"Another issue with the "store everything" approach is staff turnover"

That is why the data collection process should be described as specifically as possible and documentated in meaningful format or metadata and be made available to the data staff for future reference.

 

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/27/2014 11:16:07 AM
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@Seth:

"Store first and ask later has left us with huge amounts of data stored, but only around 20% is analyzed. "

Still we can't blame the proponents of this approach as many of them are still trying to understand which "part" of the data is/will actually be useful.

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/24/2014 12:54:42 PM
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That simply comes with communication. Companies should try to avoid having solitary Gurus for each facet of the organization. If you're storing old data, ensure that everyone on the data team is aware of its purposes.

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/24/2014 9:01:19 AM
NO RATINGS

Another issue with the "store everything" approach is staff turnover. Someone who thought it was a good idea to grab all of the data from that source over there, just in case, left the company two years ago, and that data is still churning into the system. And, it may be that nobody even knows that you are collecting it or why.

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/24/2014 1:27:32 AM
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Store first and ask later has left us with huge amounts of data stored, but only around 20% is analyzed. The information is tagged or indexed.  That number is bound to increase as the internet of things increases the amount of data to be sorted through will increase. 

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/23/2014 2:44:49 PM
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@kq4ym. What type of scenario do you envision where a "save everything" strategy would be appropriate? The only thing that comes straight to mind might be a startup (or an established company looking for a new start in a new market) where maybe they have a good product/service idea but really have to define their strategy and market.

Of course that company would have failed on one of the key points that investors look at, and that is a business plan that indentifies "who's going to buy this."

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/23/2014 11:34:14 AM
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I would think a hybrid approach would serve most companies. But, there's going to be cases where storing everything will serve some future needs that are not foreseen. It's one thing to ask questions first and then build the data, but what if there's not enough to start the project? Not knowing what the question is and what data is required makes for some tricky problem solving.

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/22/2014 10:52:36 PM
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" 'store and sort later' just sounds like a massive waste of resources." It does, but I suppose that because it doesn't look as cluttered as storing physical objects that take up space, people don't think of it as quite the same kind of inefficient hoarding.

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/22/2014 3:00:54 PM
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David, maybe we should be approaching it from what it isn't versus what it is. But then, that could be a long list as well.

Re: Blind squirrels and data hoarding
  • 10/22/2014 2:41:02 PM
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@rbaz- Its true. A single definition is probably just as dangerous and impossible as multiple. What I was interested in is how philosophically opposed those two definitions seemed to be and yet both seemed to be coming from a place of expertise and experience. It seems difficult to reconcile them but hard to say either is wrong. 

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