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The Quantified Self May Have Matured
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Re: Human machines
  • 1/19/2015 10:40:15 PM
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@SaneIT, I am not brushing them off. Not only is this dependence a problem for people on a personal level (eg, a disaffecttion from the world around them). It's also a social issue. Go for a ride on any freeway in your local town, and dare to look into the cars you pass. How many drivers are watching their devices instead of the road ahead? That's but one example.

 

Re: Human machines
  • 1/19/2015 8:09:35 AM
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I don't blame the device, I'm pointing out the dependence on the devices.  I recently ran across a product to help curb the addiction, it's nothing more than a rubber iPhone shaped block that is the same dimensions and weight as an iPhone so that people don't feel like it is missing.  What I'm saying is that we need to be aware of dependencies that are created and not just brush them off.

Re: Human machines
  • 1/17/2015 11:35:33 PM
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SaneIT, you can't blame the devices for the way kids behave. Like you said, if it wasn't their phone or tablet, it would be something else. Then again, it's the teacher's perogative to create a device free zone. And in a way, even if these kids tremble and sweat that whole class, they deserve it and are better for it, whether they're conscious of it or not.

Re: Human machines
  • 1/16/2015 8:24:22 AM
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That might work but keep in mind that students are carrying to class every day and spending a good portion of their time outside class with the devices.  My kids have friends who for lack of a better word are addicted to the screen.  In those cases I'm not sure that they'll adjust to not having it for an hour a week is going to help them adjust it will just make that hour an anxiety filled mess.  The anxiety of a quiz plus not having their crutch would be hard for some of them to take.   I'm not in any way blaming technology for this issue, people will always have things that they feel attached to for the upcoming generations it just happens to be mobile devices.

Re: Human machines
  • 1/15/2015 11:42:04 PM
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@SaneIT, I would think that you could break students of that anxiety. Say, a teacher has a quiz every week for an entire semester, during which students have to leave their phones at his desk. Bu the end of the semester, you would think that anxiety level would drop when the students didn't have their phones. Similarly, take a break from work emails and social media for a day. By day two, it's a little less stressful. By day three, even less so.

Re: Human machines
  • 1/14/2015 8:17:01 AM
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I was not aware that they had public quiet zones like that.  I set quiet times for myself and people who contact me frequently know what those quiet times are.  The study I read about is detailed here http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150111195734.htm . People had trouble focusing on a test if their phone was taken away from them.  The phone really had nothing to do with taking the test but the anxiety of not having their phone resulted in lower scores.  I wonder if we run into the same types of issues with students who go into quiet zones in schools or have to turn in devices before taking tests.

Re: Human machines
  • 1/13/2015 10:04:10 AM
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@SaneIT. I think anyone who works in a digital world goes through some degree of withdrawal when forced into radio-free environments. I got a taste of it yesterday while traveling when my wireless adapter went funky. OK, my stress level went up, but it wasn't the end of the world.

Here's an experiment someone could try:

There are "quiet" cars on Amtrak. There are cell-free buses, restaurants, and other locations. When people opt for this quiet, cell-free zones or services, why do they do it? Do they want to be isolated from the digital world? Do they want to be distant from the sometimes moronic chatter of a one-sided cell conversation? Do they just want to concentrate on their own online, but silent digital life? 

Re: Human machines
  • 1/12/2015 8:11:04 AM
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I saw an article recently about people moving to a town in West Virginia because it is a radio dead zone.  While the numbers are small and the reason for moving seems to be a sensitivity to radio waves (not sure how that works) but I have moments when I wish I had a technology free zone or a mandatory mobile technology quiet time. I just heard about a study that shows people actually suffer from withdrawal symptoms when separated from their mobile device.  I don't see a push toward the quantified self making that any better.

Re: Human machines
  • 1/9/2015 9:04:47 AM
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Good point about individuality and relying on devices. Some years ago I had neighbors who frequently just wouldn't answer their home phone. Why? Because they didn't feel it was worth interrupting what they were doing at the time or who they were talking to. It drove me nuts. Now I understand why they did it, and I envy people who hit "reject call" when their cell goes off.

Re: Human machines
  • 1/9/2015 9:01:14 AM
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I'm talking about my smart phone when I say GPS.  Who uses a stand-alone GPS anymore?


Guilty, but I use it in the woods where the maps on phones aren't all that useful.

One thing I taught my kids when they were learning to drive was to always have a mental image of an aerial view of where they are in relation to some standard (and big) landmark, so they know which way is north/south and which way is east/west. Being near the Atlantic that's always been fairly reliable. The same applies to a large lake or mountain range. You might get lost in a confusing neighborhood, but when it comes to driving up and down Route 95, for example, north and what lies over the horizon usually is a pretty safe bet.

 And, even the math-challenged like me can do the 25% of 400. What's 27% of 400? (um, where's my phone?)

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