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My Body, My Life, My Health Data
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Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/16/2015 3:43:52 PM
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It's much easier to keep a customer than it is to get a new one, especially from a strictly dollars perspective. Quality customer support is certainly a way to retain users.

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/16/2015 8:57:24 AM
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@Broadway I once had a dentist who did something like that and she's the reason I eventually needed a root canal in a particular tooth. The temporary she put in for the kind of overlay she pushed on me introduced a space between teeth that fostered decay. Dental insurance tracks what work has been done on each tooth, so if a dentist puts in something that s/he didn't do, it may not cover it when it's done for real.

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/15/2015 11:27:11 PM
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@Ariella, that's a horrible story about your root canals. I find that dentists tend to be even worse when it comes to abusing the insurance system. I can't tell you the number of rotten HMO dentists I've been too whose game is to make up medical conditions in your mouth to game the system. Sure, call me a anti-dentite.

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/15/2015 1:50:27 PM
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I'm with you on this one - not signing into anything related to my medical care with a Facebook login. Not that I know of specific problems, it just doesn't seem right.

PC

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/15/2015 10:44:22 AM
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<Sign in with Facebook? I hate that idea even for innocuous things. For my medical data? No way.>

@James I couldn't agree more. Not only does that give FB a lot of personal data on you, but it can end up giving the social network permission to share information with its default setting of passive sharing. 

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/15/2015 10:41:14 AM
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@James you're right. It is a coding game. Sometimes the codes don't necessarily bring in more money for the doctor, just greater cost out of pocket. For example, after noticing that I got billed for a copay on the blood test of only one of my kids, I spoke to my insurance company to find out why. The reason was that the other kids who had the test at the checkup got it coded as preventative care, which is covered 100%. This one came in for it another time (as they don't want the kid to eat before) and it ended up coded as diagnostic, which is subject to copyas. 

Some in-office people know how to game the coding system. I've had root canals done at 3 different practices. Two of them charged about the same, in keeping with the insurance contract amount. But one of them billed more than 3 times as much as the others for what amounted to the same procedure. The difference was that the biller would add on a host of small procedures to the code for the root canal itself. Consequently, even though my insurance covered 80%, just my portion alone was substantial. 

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/15/2015 9:13:11 AM
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@micturp. The medical records services that you describe seem like a good start, and I recognize that it's unlikely that all of our past records will ever be included in our "personal" medical record. However I think the AMA or some other industry body has to come out and endorse the idea that it's the patient, not the doctor or insurance company, that really owns that patient data. Maybe that could get the ball rolling a lot faster.

Even if data is encrypted on a card or device I think you still need to have it backed up at some secure facility like a cloud service.

Sign in with Facebook? I hate that idea even for innocuous things. For my medical data? No way.

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/15/2015 8:10:17 AM
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This is where data can get in the way if you ignore the human element.  Sure they were probably doing things that were supported by the fact that they were going to improve specific metrics but as you noted it caused harm inadvertently.  This is the difference between presenting raw data and working with the data you have to determine the best course.

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/14/2015 11:47:49 PM
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@micturp, I cannot believe that a medical provider would open up its medical files to a social media site. At least, not their entire files. Actual medical files are so tightly regulated I cannot believe Facebook would have the clearance to even sniff them. Perhaps they allow you to link to FB for "fluffier" health stuff, like wellness --- to say you are participating in their smoking cessation program, or that you lost weight.

Re: Better Medical Records
  • 1/14/2015 6:09:22 PM
NO RATINGS

There are actually companies that provide this service.  I was provided two options (perhaps only for xrays, mri's, those kinds of images) at a particular clinic.  I'll try to find them (they're buried under all my paperwork medical records somewhere) so I can share here. One was a cloud service -- so there's that pesky question, also, about who really accesses and owns your data.

Other comprehensive records options are coming online as we speak: CalIndex or via your Health Insurance Provider (Blue Cross/Anthem is current example)

In meantime, my bigger question is back to:  who owns the data, especially if it's in the cloud.  It's a question with all our data, but in HIPAA manner.  

More to the point, have you noticed that your medical Provider online systems (Sutter Pacific's Follow My Health portal) allows you sign in with Facebook or other social sites.  Appalling to me.  You cannot say there's only a technology hook; we don't really know what the partnership agreements may have in them (now or in the future) -- and by agreeing to sign in with one of those accounts, we surely don't look at any Terms and Conditions.

And, if we did: we'd just "click" to Accept.  All data is then social and is also medical?  Scary!

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