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When Hoarded Data Turns Creepy
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Re: Cumbersome and Intrusive
  • 1/31/2015 9:38:08 PM
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Maryam, on phone calls, there are hardly many ways to verify your identity. It has to be your personal details that only you are expected to know. It can sound intrusive but there aren't many options available.

Re: Irrelevant data
  • 1/31/2015 9:34:27 PM
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Sethbreedlove, oh ok you are talking from control perspective. I apologize.

Yes. Some sensitive information shouldn't be changes without thorough verification. What I don't like is that the questions that they ask when enabling internet purchases through credit cards. If a close relative or a friend who is in possession of my credit card by whatever means, he can easily verify my personal details and get the credit card activated for internet purchase and go on.

Re: Irrelevant data
  • 1/31/2015 9:30:05 PM
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Jamescon

" At least once the problem is fixed you can hang up on the "feedback" calls. When the problem is active you're stuck"

:) Yes that's one way to go. Although that sounds a bit immoral but the volume of such calls we receive forces us to do that.

Re: Cumbersome and Intrusive
  • 1/28/2015 11:10:03 PM
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@Maryam: It reminds me of a time when I was stranded one weekend in the middle of Nowhere, New Hampshire (not the actual town name), with exactly one dollar on me -- and I needed more money.  I went to what may well have been the only ATM in town -- only to find my card getting declined.  I had to call my bank's customer support line, and "for [my] security," they proceeded to ask me nearly-impossible-to-answer questions.  These questions included details about my transactions with the bank within the last THREE MONTHS, for which I would have to refer to an old banking receipt.

Fortunately, I happened to have a George Costanza wallet that allowed me to locate such a receipt, but I remember hollering at the corporate drone/dimwit on the other end of the line, "I want LESS security--not more!"

Re: Too many questions
  • 1/28/2015 11:06:37 PM
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Man, I'm starting to regret signing up for 23andMe, now!  Next thing I know, I'll be getting questions about my ancestry and my DNA!

For my "security" and "privacy," of course.

Re: Too many questions
  • 1/28/2015 11:05:31 PM
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@kq4ym: It's the same when you go to check your credit report online (on the OFFICIAL free credit report site, annualcreditreport.com).  You have to answer all sorts of obscure questions about past addresses, past purchases, old lines of credit, etc., as a means of verifying your identity for your security, but in taking these efforts to protect consumers' data privacy, the credit bureaus are actually creeping us out and letting us know just how much our privacy has been invaded and how little is truly private anymore.

Re: Too many questions
  • 1/28/2015 1:12:57 PM
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..

Jim writes


In the end though the whole thing struck me as overkill for the task that was at hand (changing the delivery date on a shipment). I could see going that far back for a background check on a government job applicant or even I wanted to be a little league coach or something else where I would be around kids. But shifting a delivery from Wednesday to Friday at the address on file?  


 

Sometimes I have the suspicion that they just want to update their files and tweak their info in your virtual dossier when they really have you over a barrel. Like, trying to change a delivery date.

 

Cumbersome and Intrusive
  • 1/28/2015 1:08:26 PM
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Jim I have had the same experiences with some websites and agree that the information is intrusive. The intrusive questioning is now spreading to the password realm where you u need to provide answers to somewhat personal questions from your childhood and in some cases remember which prompt questions you choose. There really has to be a better way, it's cumbersome and intrusive and in the end how useful is it?

Re: Too many questions
  • 1/28/2015 10:31:55 AM
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@kq4ym. I can see a state agency being able to dig that far back into your past. They have those unique identifiers like your social security number. However, in this case, the company had nothing like that. I certainly never gave them my SSN, and they wouldn't have known a credit card number (the retailer got that when I made my purchase). I can only guess that they have access to some database that has all of the James Connolly's (maybe even the Irish revolutionary and the first gold medal winner of the modern olympics) and maybe use something like my cell number (which I didn't have when I lived at one of the addresses and I wouldn't have used in registering vehicles 20 years ago) to build out some kind of pattern of potential "answers" based on some "most likely" rule of logic.

In the end though the whole thing struck me as overkill for the task that was at hand (changing the delivery date on a shipment). I could see going that far back for a background check on a government job applicant or even I wanted to be a little league coach or something else where I would be around kids. But shifting a delivery from Wednesday to Friday at the address on file?  

 

Re: Creepy private snoopers
  • 1/28/2015 9:48:41 AM
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@Lyndon. Good point about government not being the only entity that monitors us (snoops). While government agencies may collect a lot of data, I wonder if the private sector actually collects (and uses or shares) more, including our most critical data, such as financial records, payments, purchases, likes/dislikes, and health information.

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