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Data Scientists Are Human Today, But Software Tomorrow
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Re: Technology of the near future
  • 1/30/2015 7:14:17 PM
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CandidoNick, that is truly an achievable goal that we are progressing towards. But beyond that, even the analytical is a target. We humans may be relegated to affirming the finished jobs.

Re: bogged down in the data weeds
  • 1/30/2015 1:51:51 PM
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Seth the danger with Survey monkey type application is that it makes anyone think they are a researcher when developing questions that yield real answers and organizing research is a very specific skill. The same would be true with data automation that is not well architected.

Re: bogged down in the data weeds
  • 1/30/2015 12:08:34 PM
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I do think that in the next few decades we will have software that will replace SQL and R with a more human-friendly interface.  Many of the mundane stuff we do with data is repeated over and over and many of the data requests, ie. "give me only variable X and Y during these times periods from this region" are the same tasks repeated over and over. 

I kind of think it is similar to Survey Monkey that allowed us to skip dumping all that data into Excel and then graphing it, because it knows what type of questions we are going to ask already. 

 

Re: bogged down in the data weeds
  • 1/29/2015 3:21:46 PM
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@KathleeenBernard. Good point about the amount of work that cleaning and organizing data requires. If that can be automated to some degree that should help the data professional focus on the real value they bring with analytics.

bogged down in the data weeds
  • 1/29/2015 3:07:20 PM
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As a person who lives in the data, I will be happy when I can have help cleaning and getting big data sets ready to run through R, Enterprise Miner, SAS and other programs that I need to use to fit the project that I am on at the time.  The hard stuff is getting the data in shape so it can be used to model, report, analyze or whatever else I may be doing with it.  It can take days/weeks just to get the data cleaned, validated and ready to move to the next step, all the while I have people screaming at me "why is it taking so long" and I have not even started on the hard part yet.  You can not replace people with technology completely.  AI is not at the point that it can reason and think outside the box, until it is my job is safe.  I will however take all the help I can from a program that wants to help me do the cleaning, validating and other prep stuff that everyone forgets has to be done before we can even think about actually starting on a project.

Re: Technology of the near future
  • 1/28/2015 6:19:11 PM
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The technology will continue to forge ahead, however. We may be nearing a point where human intervention is merely analytical.

Re: Technology of the near future
  • 1/28/2015 4:19:55 PM
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Jim I think the tech advances will eliminate the data crunching tasks and the manual type tasks, like in so many other fields that have leveraged automation for speed accuracy and cost savings. In the future I think the data scientist will be the individual that that makes conclusions from the results and architects the data requirements.

Technology of the near future
  • 1/28/2015 10:39:33 AM
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Interesting angle taken by Jeff. I think that when we talk about the skills gap in analytics we do so with the assumption that the technology stays static. However, we've seen that tech doesn't do that. Advancements in automation are most likely to take place in the people-intensive areas, perhaps data collection, cleansing and organization. Also, it makes sense that there would be tech advances in areas such as the user interface and use of templated apps that business users perhaps tweak for their own purposes and specific queries.

Where do those of you in the A2 community see likely tech advances?



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