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Reviewing Your Data with R
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Re: Addicted to off the shelf apps
  • 4/30/2015 11:25:53 PM
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Pierre, going down the line, may be few decades from now, organizations will not have MIS/ERP consultants or language programmers but rather every financial / marketing / inventory / HR analyst will be required to possess these skills to get recruited. 

Re: Addicted to off the shelf apps
  • 4/4/2015 5:43:28 PM
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You raise a terrific point about speed and convenience, which results from investing in a certain platform.  I think it also makes adding people a bit complicated too, if an organization is seeking someone to come onboard and get going with a given platform.

Re: What R you doing
  • 3/29/2015 10:07:05 PM
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Yes, not everyone has to be an expert but it helps.

Re: What R you doing
  • 3/29/2015 12:55:19 PM
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Bulk, yes academically it is a good skill to learn. It gives you deeper perspective on the thing you are working and a quick resolution in case some problem arises.

Re: R interfaces with SaS
  • 3/3/2015 9:38:32 PM
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Thanks Maryam. I think there has been a lot of support for R, but from varied sources. Not like Angular JS which has Google support.  But from what I have seen, it's been widespread.  The most intersting aspect has been Microsoft's purchase of Revolution Analytics, a key software provider, so depending on what Microsoft does, the support may go higher than the current data scientific community. 

Re: What R you doing
  • 3/1/2015 9:48:33 PM
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@WaqasAltaf, I take the same aproach in my business life, I do very little coding, and what I do is only at the very begining stage of projects. Academically I do a lot of coding and teach the bennifits of it to my students because it can be a big benifit to them and my hope is it helps them get ahead. 

Re: What R you doing
  • 2/28/2015 11:42:20 PM
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bulk, ok. I think your convincing style would be pretty good :) I haven't taught such to any student but I used to tell them the same thing that it is important to understand what's on the backend. Some friends learnt it and went really far but over the time I started believing that programming languages are not really rewarding. If I want to get something done, I can outsource it to programmers who can do it at a nominal cost unless it is really complex.

Re: What R you doing
  • 2/28/2015 11:36:30 PM
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@WaqasAltaf, I can say from my persepctive that when I lecture to non-CS and non-IT students at my university I stress the importaints of learning to code because it can go a long way to helping in many tasks in their future. A lot of students have come back to me and showed a great deal of interest. and many have gone on to take several programing classes. Now, if that translates to them learning R down the road, I have no idea, but the interest is there. 

 

Re: What R you doing
  • 2/28/2015 11:22:16 PM
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Bulk, I think a lot of interest will develop in R if the demand is apparent by the employers, clients and analysts. However, I am still skeptical about any non-programmers being excited about learning this language as the times have changed. In the past, everyone jumped in and learned atleast HTML.

Re: R revealed
  • 2/28/2015 11:10:35 PM
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Louis, after a very long time I have heard people talking seriously about programming languages. Things have just gotten too refined in the industry for new comer to focus on what's on the backend.

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