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Hey, CEO, This Is a Computer!
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Re: Good Ideas
  • 4/6/2015 8:36:15 AM
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The "tape and run" tactic might have to be the preferred method in many firms that just don't want to change. But, nonetheless, trying to think like customers might very well be the clue to a successful track. The hard part probably isn't the thinking, but making the investment and decision to modify company direction.

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/26/2015 9:43:53 AM
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I think we will always striggle with what information should be black box - ie plausible deniability for legal and ethical reasons - versus what the public expects a CEO to know.

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/24/2015 9:31:52 AM
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Good point. Some execs do want to know the "how" behind technology (how it works), but they all wan to the know the "what", as in what it can do for the business. Focus on the latter and that will keep it simple.

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/24/2015 6:26:15 AM
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good stuff. They just gloss over when anything technical comes up. My secret is to keep it as simple as possible. The move towards cloud is critical for some business and it always get thier attention when they realise it is mission critical process.

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/23/2015 12:27:10 PM
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@Seth. Good point about understanding what your peers around the company actually do. You don't have to understand the real nitty gritty things of how they do it. It's funny, thinking back over the decades with several employers. At company meetings and in company newsletters and memos the emphasis tends to be on the accomplishments of particular departments. "John and Jane's department produced 10% more widgets than ever before." That's important to know. However, it's worth drilling down a bit to understand how those widgets are used in advancing the company strategy, maybe who the competitors for that group are, and a bit about how the group actually produces them (molding/machining in house? outside sourcing? etc.).

 

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/23/2015 10:02:32 AM
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I agree completely. If you are responsible, you should have some knowledge- even if you often delegate.

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/22/2015 9:42:03 PM
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What's scary - some SEOs do not know excel, either. ;-)

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/20/2015 11:05:28 PM
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@Tom, in this particular case it was the directors pride that kept her or him from learning new things from people that were technically under her.   Also, this person had been with the company for over 25 years.  He or she just didn't feel the need to learn because that was someone else's job. 

I always feel it is important to have an understanding of what your co-workers do and surrounding departments do.   Having a mutual understanding of what it takes to get the job done prevents a lot of conflicts. 

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/20/2015 11:21:52 AM
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Our CEO could use a good idea once in a while. I'll certainly keep this article close.

Re: Good Ideas
  • 3/20/2015 9:43:56 AM
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I agree that it is not unrealistic for the CEO to have know knowledge of how coding is done and what some of the key issues are. That will help him ( or her) make informed decisions.

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