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Five Tips for Enabling the Modern Web Experience
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Re: Mobile presentation
  • 4/13/2015 10:10:04 PM
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..

From John Balla's blog post:


Today's modern web experience is visual
As little as three years ago, web pages were all very text-heavy and seemed like they were inspired by the traditional print media. Thankfully, those types of pages are increasingly rare (usually limited to the obligatory terms and conditions window that pops up for WiFi access).
Now, web pages increasingly use card design, with visual elements designed to look like individual cards. To be clearer, card design is like this screen-shot of Pinterest below. Every element has a picture, a title and a very short description. Often there's a link to take you to more pictures or underlying detail, but it looks like a series of cards.


Yahoo.com has been redesigned that same way, with card design.


The beauty of card design is that it allows you to easily adapt to multiple browsers and devices ....


 

I'm a strong believer in visuals, graphics, to alleviate the monotony of text and convey information in alternative ways.

But I'm getting increasingly irritated with text vanishing and graphics taking its place, when I spend extra time poking through all the nice feel-good graphics in websites trying to find the basic essential information I'm looking for...

 

Re: Mobile presentation
  • 4/11/2015 9:10:36 PM
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Google has been pushing it's design format for several years not and most likely is a big contributor to web design switching to compatible formats for web and mobile. The real key is as pointed out.. "customers' and their expectations are ever-changing," and that makes for some creative and quick moves by design teams and web masters for sure.

Re: Mobile presentation
  • 3/30/2015 10:24:23 AM
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@James, that's a good point, I've found out the hard way that a restaurant moved too.  When you have social tools that are driving business to you it is incredibly important that you are paying attention to it.  I know a handful of restaurants that moved somewhat regularly as they grew or closed and the owner reopened under a new name either because of franchise changes or menu changes and they wanted the new restaurant to stand out.  If you've got zombie entries on the social media sites it's going to work against you in these instances.

Re: Mobile presentation
  • 3/27/2015 9:15:56 AM
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@SaneIT. The other thing about those reviews is that unless some reviewer thinks to make note of it nobody is going to go in and say, "Restaurant went out of business."

Re: Long web pages
  • 3/27/2015 9:12:29 AM
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@Lyndon. One issue that the web has to overcome when it comes to length of page/article is in managing reader expectations. In a newspaper or magazine format it's easy to see how long the article is in most cases simply by looking at the layout (the exception is when the article does the dreaded double and triple jump across many disconnected pages). If you see that it's multiple full pages you know to get another cup of coffee.

On the web you might start reading and reading and get to the bottom of a long page only to discover that it continues on to another (possibly) long page.

Good design can help to deal with this. However, there's also a burden on the writer. News writers who used to be limited to a certain number of words or column inches in the print world often look at the web with it's unlimited space and rather than carefully select the details and quotes that best tell the story they include everything in their notebook, often with no thought to organization.

All of this will take some adjustment over time.

 

Long web pages
  • 3/26/2015 11:21:42 PM
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..

Very interesting food for thought. The discussion of long web pages particularly caught my attention.

I do try to avoid long pages in a web format because I find them tiresome to read, even on a desktop PC with a widescreen monitor. However, they can't be avoided in many cases because of the nature of the information and other factors.

Here's an example of a page on a website for which I'm a contributing editor:

Long saga of Guadalupe-Lamar light rail planning told in maps

The length is affected partly by the narrow format. But this is a basically free WordPress website with free WordPress hosting, including something like 3 Gb of graphics space (in 2 years, with lots and lots of graphics, we've used just 2%). So I can't complain.

In any case, even with a wider page format, this would still be a fairly long page. So, for this kind of purpose, I guess you have to figure that readers that are interested in the subject will read all of it online, or else print it and read a hardcopy. Or something.

Which segues to another thought. Is reading from webpages (whether on desktops, laptops, or small devices) as tiresome for other people as it is for me? Is reading hardcopy less tiresome just because I'm more accustomed to it, or is there really some drawback in the medium?

And if there is a drawback in the medium, will that be — is that — affecting the content and people's willingness to read it? In comparison, say, to how much people used to read newspapers, magazines, books, and other hardcopy materials?

I'm not exactly a Web luddite or something — I edit and/or write for at least 8 online websites/publications. But I am concerned about how much this creep toward eventual total online publication will affect our ability to obtain and process information.

 

Re: Mobile presentation
  • 3/25/2015 7:48:40 AM
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@James that is an excellent point about the travel and restaurant review sites being mobile friendly.  It brings up another issue, if your business is covered by one of those review sites and you're not grooming the presentation on those sites it is going to come back to bite you.  I can't tell you how many times I've been traveling and someone says "oh you have to go to this place", I get to the city and kind of remember the name of the place so I open up a popular review site on my phone and start the process of trying to figure out if I really do want to go there.  Quite often I'm met with an abandoned restaurant profile.  I know that not every place can afford someone out there managing every site that may mention them but someone and I don't care if it's a cousin, niece/nephew, grandmother needs to be making sure I'm not looking at a ghost town of landing page.  This holds true for companies outside of the restaurant business before I make large purchases I tend to scan the sites of several local places to see who has something similar to what I want.  If their page is hard for me to navigate I don't even bother trying to hunt for things on their site.

 

Re: Mobile presentation
  • 3/24/2015 2:34:43 PM
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@SansIT, I am that way, if a site looks bad on mobile then I will get frustrated and just not brows it, most times I end up not going back to it either. To me mobile is key, it has to be there or its not worth having the presents. 

Re: Mobile presentation
  • 3/24/2015 9:35:10 AM
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@SaneIT. Good point about the restaurant that gets left behind if it's site isn't mobile friendly. What the owners of that place have to remember is that the travel and dining review sites where people talk about their restaurant ARE mobile friendly. So, the restaurant's exposure ends up being limited to reviews that are beyond their control.

Mobile presentation
  • 3/24/2015 8:03:35 AM
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These are great pieces of advice. What many companies have yet to realize is that mobile browsing is increasing and when their site isn't friendly to mobile devices people turn away.  When a group of friends are talking about where to go to dinner and they all pull out phones, if one of the restaurants makes it nearly impossible to view a menu, or even navigate their page on a mobile device they are automatically at a disadvantage.  This goes for just about any business that relies on word of mouth for a large part of their advertising.  Since people have the ability to access a site seconds after a conversation or during a conversation companies need to be aware of the impression it makes when someone visits their site for the first time using a mobile device.



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