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If You Only Knew What Your Doctor Knows
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Re: The litigation factor
  • 4/27/2015 4:57:45 PM
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I would not mind at all carrying some sort of digial storage with me at all times in case of medical emergencies. But, I'm guessing that's not going to happen anytime in the near future. The medical establishment has nothing at this time to gain by devoting resources to that idea. The collection of records seems at present to be more of a billing necessity than a medical history gathering effort. And probably it's a big part of preventing legal action especially if the patient doesn't know what the records reflect.

Re: The litigation factor
  • 4/17/2015 3:06:38 PM
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..

Rbaz writes


The medical malpractice cost is a concern that can and should be addressed legislatively for the betterment of all concern. But I believe it not to be the prevailing reason for the resistance to make medical records available. Doctors don't relish debating or presenting complex medical problems with all technical details to the intellectually unprepared, which basically compromise the vast majority of us. They are forced to advise as best they can, in layman speak, which is basic at best.


 

Rbaz is probably right here. Unless you understand medispeak, you'd probably freak out over some of what you might see described in your medical reports.

That said, it's generally irritating that I cannot get my own lab reports sent directly to me, but have to request them through my medical practitioner. Fortunately, so far she has obliged.

Incidentally, what happened to all the visions of electronically consolidated medical records that were conjured up during the original political discussions over the Affordable Care Act?

 

Re: The litigation factor
  • 4/7/2015 6:25:25 PM
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The medical malpractice cost is a concern that can and should be addressed legislatively for the betterment of all concern. But I believe it not to be the prevailing reason for the resistance to make medical records available. Doctors don't relish debating or presenting complex medical problems with all technical details to the intellectually unprepared, which basically compromise the vast majority of us. They are forced to advise as best they can, in layman speak, which is basic at best.

Re: The litigation factor
  • 4/7/2015 10:34:34 AM
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@PredictableChaos That is a very high figure. I guess when someone has a bad outcome with something like childbirth that is considered safe now people try to find some way to cope with their grief. Law suits are very expensive and people don't have money to take that route in some countries. So they rarely think of suing. I do know there have been cases where doctors were sued. Mostly in the area of plastic surgery. People who go for surgeries like that most probably have the money to sue the doctors concerned.

Re: The litigation factor
  • 4/6/2015 12:06:02 PM
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Fear of litigation is real. I heard from an Ob/Gyn resident that 93% of US doctors in that specialty are sued. Many of the remaining 7% probably work for insurance companies or other not-practicing roles.

If you deliver enough babies, over a long enough time; there will be a bad outcome for someone at some point. In the US at least, a bad outcome often leads to a lawsuit regardless of what happened or if anyone was at fault.

Great.
  • 4/4/2015 8:08:58 PM

Great; now I'm going to be paranoid about getting a tumor.  :p

Incidentally, I heard a distressing story on the local newsradio here involving a study in which researchers found that nearly half of doctors did not tell the patient or patient's family in the case of the original diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer's.  That's just messed up.

(Of course, it being newsradio, there was little discussion of methodology.  Perhaps the patients surveyed forgot.  But still, one would think the family would know.)

Re: The litigation factor
  • 4/2/2015 11:55:03 AM
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That's a lot to pay for a malpractice insurance premium. I haven't seen many malpractice cases back home. I don't even think many doctors have them. And they've always given all my medical records to me. The only hassle is to carry the whole lot with me when I go to see the doctor. They do keep records but they used to be in paper form and would take ages to find. I like the idea of a smart card but is it safe? When you consider the risk of identity theft wouldn't it be dangerous to carry one around? But I do think a note with all your special allergies and emergency contacts should be with you at all times.

Re: The litigation factor
  • 4/1/2015 4:55:07 PM
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Terry, that's interesting about malpractice insurance. We've heard for years how expensive it is. Then your friend shares the information about what it was costing him, but I've read articles from other doctors saying the premium cost argument can be a myth, and that they pay less than what they pay for car insurance. Of course, maybe the guys saying that drive Bentleys.

 

The litigation factor
  • 4/1/2015 3:34:00 PM
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Good, timely topic, Jim. But I have tyo say, no, I don't find it ironic it's easier to get other kinds of histories, given what's happen in the medical malpractice arena.

A good friend who was for years an ER doctor finally hung up his stethoscope when malpractice premiums started costing him 50% of his take-home pay. More than his mortgage, more than what he was paying to send one of his kids to an expensive East Coast university (sorry, I know that's redundant).

Each exam, each diagnostic test is a potential lawsuit. This is the reality medical professionals live with. I'm not defending their practices or ethos, but there are good reasons they're less than thrilled with handing over all that's been compiled on your behalf.



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