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The Sands of Time Go Digital
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Re: What can go?
  • 7/29/2015 10:18:01 AM
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@SaneIT. Right, drawing on the experience of a master could get a kid through that first recital. But imagine if the kid could really get inside the brain of the master and understand how they created music rather than just playing it. I wonder how many people have untapped potential for creativity or insight into the world around them, potential that might be unlocked by seeing even a brief glimpse of how a master or even a commoner views things.

I know, I'm still thinking of how I would spend the billions that I'll never have, but those that don't have still can dream.

Re: What can go?
  • 7/29/2015 10:11:18 AM
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@kq4ym. You ask why time seems to fly sometimes and drag at other times. The answer is in the old saying, "Time flies when you're having fun." Let's "Time drags when you're not."

Picture being in the waiting room of an auto repair shop, doctor or dentist. How often do you check the time, only to see that it is three minutes later than the last time?

 

Re: What can go?
  • 7/29/2015 8:03:16 AM
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That's a very good example of "do this" but it being difficult to put in to words and harder to put into practice.  I think of things like playing the piano or touch typing, just the repetition of putting your hands in the right spot and knowing how far to reach makes a huge difference, letting an artificial memory guide you through that seems like it would be very effective and think of all the kid who could avoid the clunky notes of stage fright at their first recital.

Re: What can go?
  • 7/29/2015 7:41:17 AM
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I remember reading somewhere a long time ago that the age most folks were the happiest for about 35. I'm well past that and not sure if I'd return to that age if I could. But, time does seem to fly by as we age, but on the other hand I've noticed periods when time seems to go by very slowly. Any explanation for slowing of time sensations?

Re: What can go?
  • 7/28/2015 9:38:51 AM
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@SaneIT. The idea of feeding the performance of star professionals to young athletes is great for those who have some level of coordination, etc. It reminded me of watching an instructional video by old-time professional golfer Lee Trevino, who could hit his drives on a straight line barely off the ground for what seemed like miles. He went through all the steps that he follows with his swing, and he concluded with, "If you do it like that every time you'll hit your drives long and straight." My thought was that if I could do anything with my swing the same way every time, I'd be Lee Trevino. But what I couldn't do was repeat the same swing twice in a row. I never became Lee Trevino.

 

 

Re: What can go?
  • 7/28/2015 8:02:11 AM
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Since we're giving up ideas, I have a similar idea that requires all of the sensory information as well.  Sports training, how many kids go to year of dance classes, gymnastics, soccer, etc and struggle to get coordination and movement down.  I had an idea of taking the performance of a professional and letting others replay that in their heads to build the mind/muscle connections. 

Re: Time flies
  • 7/27/2015 10:34:56 AM
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@jamescon, right you are. We do anticipate every issue to lay in wait for our return from vacation, but we are reminded at times that the workings of the world does start or cease with us.

Re: What can go?
  • 7/27/2015 9:38:01 AM
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@SaneIT. You've touched on a project that I plan to fund once I become a billionaire. (I admit that the odds a against that ever happening).

It relates to your "store memories on blu-ray" idea.

Suppose you could capture someone else's memories on an advanced storage system, even if it was only a few seconds of their life, and then share it with others.

So, it wouldn't just a video with general sound, but specifically what that person saw and heard, plus the tactile sensations, smells, etc., and the emotions that went with it. What were they thinking of when the play happened, and how did that fit into their historical/personal perspective.

What comes right to mind is something like the experience of someone making the game-winning play in the Super Bowl. (Selling that memory probably could pay for the whole project). From an educational viewpoint, maybe how a genius solved a complex problem, or what a slow-learning actually sees when presented with a problem. On the business front, what does a customer really see and feel when using a product.

On the social front, imagine being able to see through the eyes of someone of another race, gender or economic class as they went through even a small part of their day. How did they view the world around them based on their life experience? How could that shared memory (not just how they described it but how it really felt) change our understanding of other people?

Hmm, sounds like the Vulcan Mindmeld.

 

Re: Time flies
  • 7/27/2015 9:19:07 AM
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@rbaz. The defrag concept isn't a bad one. An example that I've noticed in the past is to come back from vacation and see a long, reply to all email trail that opened while you were gone. From the last message in the trail you see that the issue arose, was discussed, was dealt with, and was closed. Doesn't it feel good to send that whole trail off to the email archive?

Re: What can go?
  • 7/27/2015 7:56:26 AM
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Now I'm wondering, we've got projects that can create images from brain activity and projects that wipe traumatic memories from our brains so what if we combined the two, record some of the nice but not so important memories like say the layout of the office building you walked through every day 10 years ago then wiped the memory.  That way if you ever really needed it you could pop in the Blu-ray disk and watch it again.

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