Comments
Health Analytics: Find Data Beyond the Hospital Doors
You must login to participate in this chat. Please login.

Bob made a couple of points I found interesting, one of which was relevant to my first comment - big data - what's the problem?   A statistician/medical researcher would say "false positives." 

The other comment I found interesting was that upon finding a certain set of possible factors indicating potential readmission problem, assign a care manager to shepherd the patient through how to avoid having the problem get worse.  The analytics department then should be looking for patterns and developing simple decision rules.  I think that is part of his middle road - moving toward something operational that the managers and doctors (and others) can use easily.

 

Prospector

Hey, everyone you can keep chatting if you'd like. But for now, thanks to all for participating.

Editor

Right, Colin, he was talking about the challenges that analytics pros can have in translating what they found for the average business person.

Editor

I have to run... Have a great day everyone !   Thanks again Bob and see everyone on the boards !

Blogger

@Colin_Lay   Good point, exposes the need for managers to improve their critical business approach, but this is often easier said than accomplished - A very real problem for the entire process.

Blogger

I had an entirely different take on the translation problem.  For me the translation is from the "analytics speak," coming from statistics and other approaches, to the language of a manager.  When someone tells a manager that there is a "significant" relationship between variable x and variable y, the manager could be forgiven for saying (to him/herself) "So what?  How does that affect what I do this afternoon and tomorrow?"

Prospector

I stay away from the energy drinks... otherwise I really would need a doctor!  ;)

Blogger

Joe. Time for the energy shot

Editor

We can blame the heat for that!

Blogger

@Joe  I know how you feel, I think I have checked the date twice already !  : ) 

Blogger

I can tell I could use a caffeine boost because the question that popped into my head -- before I realized how utterly stupid it was -- was: "What happens when the translator gets sick?"

(sigh.  And it's only Tuesday.)

Blogger

@Jamescon   Agreed  they ( HealthCare) have been dealing with large data sets for a long time and their approaches can help other industries for sure...

Blogger

Waqas. Most of the major hospitals in the US have access to translators for many types of languages, often in an on-call basis. However, I can see how that can be a challenge for smaller hospitals or those in nations with limited resources.

Editor

Indeed.  Thanks to Bob, and thanks, Jim, for organizing this!

Blogger

thanks Bob and A2 team for the informative radio show.

Data Doctor

I hope everyone enjoyed Bob's presentation. I think there's a lot to be learned here by healthcare providers, insurers, and government agencies.

Editor

The leadership of the hospital sets the tone. If they don't have the courtesy to honour patients, then no one down the hierarchy will take patients seriously.

Data Doctor

Thank you Bob !   This was really enlightening   And thank you too Jim and of course SAS....

Blogger

I think insurance companies have an important role to play. They place an inherent control over hospitals because if they don't perform well, patients will suffer and in result, insurance companies will suffer. When these issues become common with a particular hospital, insurance companies may put the hospitals on 'not recommended' or like list.

Data Doctor

I like that - it doesn't have to be complicated ! 

Blogger

@Joe yes, I then took my son to a different doctor for his checkup and was pleasantly surprised that this doctor called with results, and then called again just to ask how he's doing, etc. The other doctor was never available because during office hours he was too busy to call back and after office hours, his service wouldn't put you through unless you said it was an emergency. It was very frustrating when I waited a full day for lab results and he only finally called in the evening. 

Blogger

Ariella, the problem worsens in countries where there is a large number of population that does not speak national language. Anyways not being able to comprehend what patient can itself to a medical disaster of the patient.

Data Doctor

@Ariella   That is amazing to hear, one would think Spanish would have been covered....probably had Russian with no problem....very odd.

Blogger

@Ariella: Alas, that's the common liability-limiting cop-out.

Fortunately, my doctor's office *usually* isn't like that and I'm able to get reasonable and pragmatic advice about when (or if) to be seen if I call with a concern after hours.

Blogger

I hear you Joe, that what I love about being on the cutting edge !   Sounds good to me !  : ) 

Blogger

On translation: I couldn't believe that the hospital my son was in couldn't even get a competent Spanish-speaking person for his roommate who didn't understand English. They claim to offer services in a whole bunch of languages, and you'd think they'd be able to manage Spanish. I'm sure some of the nurses are bilingual, but none of those were assigned to that patient.

Blogger

Can't afford the AC or the electric bill that comes with it .....

Blogger

Joe, yes that's a common problem. Insurance companies should raise questions with a particular hospital about their scarcity of resources if it costs them in terms of higher medical claim bills. 

Data Doctor

@Joe true, and this doctor sometimes tells his patients to go to the ER when they call him with a complaint about a pain after hours.

Blogger

@Louis: Chief Translation Officer -- because why not?  ;)  We have a C-suite position for almost everything else these days.

Blogger

Good point Joe, so many "bottlenecks" in the system....

Blogger

Of course, one common reason for lots of ER visits is patient difficulty in getting an appointment with their PCP -- which I'm sure insurance companies would like to know about.

Blogger

Translation is a major issue - what would this particular position be called ?

Blogger

I think as long as patient does not get involved in the billing process till the payment step, the insurance company should not be concerned about any fraud risks. If insurance company requests for a report from a doctor, they cannot expected to challenge the report so why request in the first place. If insurance company hires a doctor for second opinion so that major operation cost are avoided, then it does make sense.

Data Doctor

A doctor we've seen says insurance companies demand reports from him when they notice patients coming to ERs repeatedly. He didin't say it ever resulted in finding a particular trigger, though. It seems to be more about avoiding the high costs involved with ER bills. 

Blogger

FWIW, this reminds me of a conference I went to wherein a guy who worked as a clinical researcher at a hospital discussed how they were able to enrich their data and research by getting data from a hospital's greatest data store: the billing department.  ;)

Blogger

One thing you can always count one - the data growing !

Blogger

That is sizeable, indeed.

 

Blogger

Hello Everyone !  Looking forward as well !

Blogger

Whats the best channel to contact Doctors and Patients? Mail? App? Personal Visit?

Prospector

Hi, guys.  Looking forward to the show in a bit.  :)

Blogger

Looking forward to the show.

Data Doctor

Generally, the way they say to prevent costs from escalating is with preventative care. But that doesn't work for all cases, as I found out when my son had not one but two spontaneous pneumothorax attacks last year. The only way to prevent future attacks is with surgery, which is a huge expense in itself. What is partiuclarly interesting is that the suregeon's practice billed about half a million dollars all told for the 2 surgeries (one on each side of the lungs) followed by their popping in while he was hospitalized. Insurance disallowed over 90% of the amounts. For example, the PA alone billed just under $10K for his 5 visits at the hospital. The insurance allowed just $250. But here's the thing: we chose a hospital and surgeon that was on our insurance and then they sent people in the practice who are not affiliated. As a result we get stuck with bills for "out of network" care when we went in good faith for someone in-network. This is a serious problem that leads patients with huge bills even when they try to do everything right according to insurance protocols.

 

Blogger

Just a few hours until today's event. You can use the "Your Post" chat box to share your questions for Bob Gladden or comments with your peers.

Editor


INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +