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When Sports Analytics Is a Fantasy
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Re: Nevada says it's gambling
  • 10/16/2015 9:16:29 AM
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@Lyndon. For once I agree with Nevada on something; that fantasy sports have turned into online gambling. Of course, Nevada also has a pretty big horse in this race. I wonder what impact fantasy sports have had on the sports books.

Nevada says it's gambling
  • 10/16/2015 6:32:02 AM
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..

Tomsg writes


I was interested to find out how states were handling this whole [area] of fantasy sports. It looks a like like online gambling in many ways. It turns out that virtually all states have determined it is a game of skill and not chance.


 

The recent scandal may have prompted a sea change on this. As today's New York Times reports, "Nevada Says It Will Treat Daily Fantasy Sports Sites as Gambling".


Nevada regulators ruled on Thursday that playing daily fantasy sports should be considered gambling, not a game of skill, and ordered websites like DraftKings and FanDuel to stop operating immediately in the state until the companies and their employees receive state gambling licenses.


 

Maybe the dam has been breached?

 

Re: And the game may be fixed!
  • 10/14/2015 12:44:40 PM
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I'm always a bit skeptical of marketing ploys and stats given by the operators. What's to say that the 250 top "elite" players aren't on that list by virtue of luck and coincidence? It would be interesting to follow those 250 and see how they fare in a longer time period. If it's not skill but luck, they'll surely lose their top positions.

Re: Fantastic fantasies
  • 10/9/2015 8:10:26 AM
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When you've got the analytics to back you up and you're getting a little boost from someone inside the company running the leagues those small wins might be $50 or $100 a game but if you've got a machine playing 100 games for you all stacked in your favor then the dollars start to pile up.  This I think is why the insider trading issue will be a very big deal for them. 

Re: Fantastic fantasies
  • 10/8/2015 4:58:50 PM
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@SaneIT. Good point about the intense fantasy sports player relying on a lot of small wins. The promise of a big jackpot is a lure, but the serious players are involved in multiple leagues with multiple teams. It's like the lottery players who just need a win, any win. Some get that satisfaction on something like scratch tickets in games that are weighted toward lots of small wins (enough to buy another ticket and keep playing) or daily number players who make lots of 25 and 50 cent bets on a stack of 20 or more tickets. Get behind those people at the convenience store and you might as well grab another slush to get you through the wait.

 

Re: Game fo Skill
  • 10/8/2015 9:03:18 AM
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@SethBreedlove Truth inadvertising would mean you'd see "More chances to lose!" Or, "Multiply your odds of winning to 20 out of a trillion!" 

Re: And the game may be fixed!
  • 10/8/2015 8:41:35 AM
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@Terry, yes, I just saw that. Insider trading in Fantasy Football, who would have thought? 

Re: Fantastic fantasies
  • 10/8/2015 8:12:57 AM
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I agree there will be a lot of corruption until a big enough player slips up or gets frustrated with the decreasing size of wins and the increasing effort to make money with these leagues.  Then we'll hear just how much chance played a part in the winnings.

Re: Fantastic fantasies
  • 10/8/2015 8:10:58 AM
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I think the problem with the analytics side though isn't so much that people are playing fantasy sports as a hobby but that they are analyzing trades, costs and potential wins to scrape away many small transactional wins.  It's not like your office pool picking teams, it is becoming systems for picking players, leagues and games where statically they can win.  This I suspect will be what gets them into trouble since it is not a game of chance when you get to this point.

Re: Game fo Skill
  • 10/7/2015 9:43:22 PM
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@ Jamescon and Tricia -  In California I'm seeing these lottery tickets that give you "20 Chances to Win!".  I laugh when I see them because I read it as "20 Chances to Lose!".  The odds are the same, it just take longer to finish. 

I wonder if analytics can be considered the same as counting cards and using a record to do it?  While technically not cheating if you keep it in your head, it is frowned upon and can get you kicked out of a Casino. 

If analytics becomes too accurate and a few winners keep on winning big, what will they do?

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