Comments
Big Data: Itís Not Just Where You Are
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Re: Location, location, location
  • 10/19/2015 9:37:57 AM
NO RATINGS

@kq4ym. Yes, credit card companies have been doing various forms of analytics for a long time, particularly in areas such as setting credit limits, etc. Where we are starting to see them do more are in applications that delve more into not just what you are spending but what you are spending on. For example, they have been doing more in recent years with classifying your purchases (travel, clothes, sporting goods, etc.). On one hand they will tell you that they do this because it helps you identify business expenses, charitable contributions and the like at tax time. But, it also helps to build a spending profile that will allow the bank and its retail/service partners target you with offers.

Re: Location, location, location
  • 10/18/2015 10:48:39 AM
NO RATINGS

I had though credit card companies had been analyzing card useage for years. I'd noticed even a decade ago that my cards that were not being used were being canceled, and most always the bank wrote me a letter advising me of that as well. Location is still the most used as pointed out, being the easiest to comprehend for most though.

Re: Location, location, location
  • 10/8/2015 4:49:30 PM
NO RATINGS

@Seth. Yes, cat videos account for a lot of data traffic, but probably much less than those videos that require viewers to be over age 18.

Re: Location, location, location
  • 10/7/2015 10:47:00 PM
NO RATINGS

I'm still fairly certain that cat videos are the largest source of data usage, both at home and work.  Though with IoT, that may change. 

Re: Location, location, location
  • 10/7/2015 5:50:18 PM
NO RATINGS

Well said, Tom.

As more visualiazion tools come into play to make other types of data less abstract--and as business finds ways to authenticate the results of analyzing this non-standard data, use will grow.

Re: Tools for analyzing unstructured data?
  • 10/7/2015 5:48:23 PM
NO RATINGS

Hi Terry,

 

Useability is still a major obstacle for big data.

Since a majority of companies use Hadoop as a big data processing engine and since Hadoop wasn't originally intended for business users, there is now an emergence of Hadoop end user tools that abstract the user away  from the underlying complexity of Hadoop with a semantic application that sits on top of the Hadoop--enabling easier data analytics for non data scientists. This is especially helpful for data that has already been digitized.

The other side of the challenge is implementing natural and visual language analysis toolsets that can "read" facial and verbal expressions that are not reduced to digitized data expressions. Such toolsets have been used in call centers and retail establishments--but most are still in pilot stages.

Mary

 

 

Location, location, location
  • 10/7/2015 2:13:05 PM
NO RATINGS

I think  maybe location data has been some of the first used because people can relate to the results and in many ways the results are tangible. As more unstructured data comes into play, it will be harder for management to visualize what is going on without good visualization tools. They are being rapidly deployed, so I do expect to see this shift in time.

Tools for analyzing unstructured data?
  • 10/7/2015 12:07:18 PM
NO RATINGS

Seems like the subtext to what you're talking about, Mary, is using the emerging tools to tap into unstructured data more fully -- text (social media content; emails), audio and video. It seems like companies have gotten the message this data goes overlooked or underused. Are there particular tools for working with unstructured data that early adopters have found useful?



INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +