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Forget Peeple, I Want a Cranky Meter App
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Re: One Positive Example
  • 10/31/2015 12:07:24 AM
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Your question is perceptive.

The course introduced us to each other. There was no requirement for further interaction. But we were encouraged to do so. To seek and provide advice from each other.

This too was a good thing.

Re: One Positive Example
  • 10/30/2015 10:51:22 PM
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PredictableChaos, did this relationship with the other people in the course continue after it was over. Did you continue to seek their counsel or at least help each other network through the organization? Or was it a fleeting connection?

One Positive Example
  • 10/27/2015 5:19:50 PM
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In my working career, I have seen an example where open and public feedback worked well among a group of peers.

This was within a management training course. The course was only offered to people who were named in the management succession plan. In other words - people with the skills and maturity to take over their bosses' jobs in the event of an urgent need.

Prior to the course, they didn't know one another. Through the training they worked together and did get to know each other well. And, near the end of the training, they had a finite opportunity to provide direct feedback to each of their peers.

As I said, it worked well.

But I see no way to extend this success to an app.

Re: Yelp for people
  • 10/26/2015 11:03:29 AM
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@SaneIT   Great point.  I used to be surprised about the emotional stability of those in my work environment.  Someone you would consider an adult is that only that by birth year.  

This is a major issue in the workplace, as we have many who have never grown up and even worse don't even no what it means to be grown up. 

Re: Yelp for people
  • 10/26/2015 10:59:04 AM
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I am in agreement with most along this thread, I don't think peer reviews are very constructive.  You cannot trust others to be objective when there are those with personal agendas that have nothing to do with constructive feedback.

Re: Yelp for people
  • 10/26/2015 9:53:07 AM
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Hearing from a group of people all in the room may very well serve some purpose for those with thick skins and a propensity to not take things too personally. But, I would guess that's not too many folks. I'm not sure I'd even want to try it once even though I'm pretty even tempered!

Re: Yelp for people
  • 10/23/2015 11:55:18 AM
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Wow, Jamescon, that's an incredible story. How did the manager take the criticism? How did he react when he realized the CEO heard all this?

As for the Live 360 approach, I've only spoken with one boss who's used it --- small sample size! --- but it went well and perhaps the greatest benefit was the trust engendered in the team that latest well after the 360.

Re: Yelp for people
  • 10/22/2015 11:41:11 AM
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..

Jim writes


Just think about the workplace. Suppose that your bosses think you are doing a good job and are happy with you. But, when the company puts in an employee-on-employee rating system you discover that your peers (or at least a vocal minority) don't like you. What does that do to morale and your ability to do your job, not knowing who hates you?


 

In my rather jaded view, a lot of techish stuff like peer-evaluating apps and some rather frivolous IoT applications are emerging just because analytics plus tech hardware development has now made almost anything possible.

It should not take a Ph.D. in psychology or sociology to realize that having people evaluate one another in a public forum can lead to nuclear war, but apparently our species needs to keep making old mistakes all over again...

 

Re: Yelp for people
  • 10/22/2015 9:15:35 AM
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@Broadway. I'd fine with the Live360 approach. You are more likely to get constructive feedback because 1) Everyone is subject to comments from their peers and 2) There is likely to be an understanding of the old parental rule, "If you wouldn't say it to someone's face, don't say it."

Of course that brings to mind an incident from many years ago when I was at an offsite and the department manager asked for feedback from the staff. He got it. Boy, did he get it. What some of the commenters didn't see was the CEO (who was scheduled to speak next) had stepped into the back of the room. Let's just say the criticisms of the manager were noted, and we had a new manager within 2 months.

Re: Yelp for people
  • 10/21/2015 10:24:30 PM
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Jamescon, I've also heard of Live 360s, where the people you pick to comment on you are in the room with you and your bosses, and everybody has it out. Generally, everyone is open to this type of live feedback, so that may temper what people say about each other, knowing that they are next. I haven't participated in these myself, but I'd like to give it a try. Once.

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