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Big Data: What's In a Name?
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Re: Words Matter
  • 1/28/2016 5:31:23 PM
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Big data has defintely been overused however analytics will be used for decades to come because it describes so many levels of evaluation. Our digital age provides us with the data to analyze so many more variables than we ever had the capability to evaluate in the past .

Re: Words Matter
  • 1/27/2016 12:15:49 PM
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Agreed. Any healthy relationship between the CIO and CEO would lead to more accurate terminology being utilized. "Big data" definitely has an air of both anticipation and skepticism. 

Re: Words Matter
  • 1/27/2016 11:20:17 AM
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@rbaz. We can't lose sight of the fact that the CIO works for the CEO. So, while they need to have a good working relationship, in the end the CEO is the boss. If the CIO doesn't like how the CEO deals with technology, it's unlikely that will get the CEO replaced.

Re: Words Matter
  • 1/26/2016 2:56:08 PM
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Agreed that the word used is an indicator, but not a complete picture of the landscape. As the CIO is eyeing the CEO and visa versa, they are codependent for overall success. Else the blame game has its buzz words as well. It usually follows failure and unemployment.

Re: Words Matter
  • 1/26/2016 1:25:34 PM
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If the CIO is that good, and the CEO is that lame.... well, I hope the board can figure it out and promote the CIO. Or at least replace the CEO.

But I know it doesn't always work that way in the real world.

Re: Words Matter
  • 1/26/2016 1:21:22 PM
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@PC- You might be right about the extraordinary CIO. I have, however, also seen pirate CIOs that fidn a way to do what they need to do even if the CEO doesn't get it. But I do think you are right that in the end, the CEO and CIO will either come to an understanding or one of them will be gone. So maybe I was too short-sighted in my scenario.

Words Matter
  • 1/26/2016 1:19:13 PM
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@David - I think you're pretty much spot-on. The words we use reflect our understanding and our sources of information. So, it's not a stretch to think we can predict the rest of the situation from how the CEO speaks about Analytics.

My one quibble is that if "you have a CIO who is extraordinary" that CIO will manage to bring the CEO on board. The CEO will have the understanding and set the right expectations for analytics and, yes, use the right words.



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