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Feeding the Hungry After a Flood
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Re: Good Map
  • 5/29/2017 5:24:19 PM
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I'm sure there must be.  When anyone applies for a mortgage they must also check to see if the property is in a flood zone, so I assume there is a data somewhere with all this information.

Re: Good Map
  • 5/13/2017 12:14:42 PM
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I've noticed how difficult it usually is to find useful graphics of emergency situations, even simple maps of just where the flooding is, hurricane affected neighborhoods, etc. etc. It seems that although government agencies are most likely generating lots of maps, graphics and data, the agencies are working often at divergent goals and either don't share in timely fashion, or publish the data in obscure online places. I wonder if there should be a "central" agency to pull together data dna publish to the public in one central location?

Re: Good Map
  • 5/9/2017 10:35:17 PM
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..

Useful map, which I think could be improved with a feature that would display the address of each distribution center (and maybe a map with directions) when you hovered over it (Robert has probably thought of this).

Would be useful to access this on a mobile device like a smartphone. But I wonder how people access the Internet if they're flood refugees and don't have access to a WiFi hotspot ...

Emergency shelters would probably be particularly dependent on the food centers, so this handy map app would be especially useful to their personnel.

..

Re: Good Map
  • 5/8/2017 5:02:00 PM
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Unfortunatley you are right- that is if they even care about the blogs enough to have someone read them.

Re: Hunger/Food supplies
  • 5/6/2017 10:35:18 PM
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@Joe I'm not sure it really is the supply itself so much as how well it is managed. I once interviewedDennis Easter, information system director at Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee. He explained that many perishable items that come in are already near the end of their shelf life. So the trick is to get that food out ahead of the food that will remain usable longer. Software helped with tracking for more efficient use.

Re: Good Map
  • 5/6/2017 10:28:18 PM
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@Terry that sounds like a very accurate assessment of the people in charge at most organizations, unfortunately. 

Re: Good Map
  • 5/6/2017 3:48:45 PM
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in re "I doubt many of the state officials would read a blog like this..."

They'd leave it to mid-level staffers to read, or if they got to it themselves, would then need someone to explain it to them. And I'm pretty sure this dynamic isn't limited to technology topics.

Those blank counties
  • 5/6/2017 3:45:51 PM
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Another interesting slice-n-dice of data and its graphical representation, Robert.

Of course I have to ask what the story is with the four counties in southern NC that have opted out of the foodbank distribution system. Maybe they have their own warehouses, or those are disaster-free jurisdictions?

Re: Good Map
  • 5/5/2017 5:15:50 PM
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You really are an optimist. I doubt many of the state officials would read a blog like this.

Re: Hunger/Food supplies
  • 5/5/2017 9:31:10 AM
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@Joe Stanganelli, that's an interesting statement and some numbers to back that up would be helpful.  From what I've seen locally supply is good even before disasters strike. I know of 2 different organizations that send enough food home with school aged kids who are technically homeless every Friday to last them through the weekend.   The last time I went to pack up bags they were sending food home with over 1000 students in the county.  When disasters hit supply tends to increase especially from out of state as we've seen with several recent events so it would be interesting to see where the gap in supply is.

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