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AI, Machine Learning Power Transformation
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Re: Brave new world
  • 5/17/2017 2:05:40 PM
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@Kq4ym certainly personalized marketing is a big thing now. I think we almost take it for granted that when order on Amazon or other sites we will see recommendations based on not just what we've purchased but what others have purchased when setting out on similar searches. The data clearly delivers better results.

Re: Brave new world
  • 5/17/2017 11:52:07 AM
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Although it would seem that looking at lots and lots of data would increase marketing possibilities "Because of the ability for AI "to fine-tune interests" on this level," I wonder if we might end up with some scenarios that might be more attributed to statistical anomalies along with the truly profitible and useful possibiilities from the result of lucky happenstance?

Re: Brighter Future
  • 5/16/2017 8:39:11 AM
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@Louis Yes, I thnk he really did. People are fond of making 1984 references, but our situation is really much more of people yielding to the screen of their own accord.

Re: Brighter Future
  • 5/14/2017 5:27:02 PM
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@PC @Ariella    Fascinating.  I wasn't aware that Bradbury had come so close to the World we live today.

Re: Brighter Future
  • 5/14/2017 1:16:32 PM
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@PC Absolutely, also the key point of the book was that it was the people's own changing tastes and inclination that resulted in books being consigned to burning. In the beginning of Anthony Esolen's book, Ten Ways to Destroy the Imagination of Your Child he describes saving some volumes from the librarian who was going to have them destroyed. With the greater intersest in digital media, many librarians are shifting shelf space prioritization and regard some books as just wasted space.

Re: Brighter Future
  • 5/12/2017 12:43:54 PM
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@Ariella - Not only did Bradbury have screens, he correctly predicted that surveilance camers would be much more common, and people would have small "radios" mounted on their ears. (He didn't know the term Bluetooth.)

He even imagined the loneliness that people would feel when they were wrapped up in their devices instead of meeting and talking with each other.

Re: Brighter Future
  • 5/12/2017 12:27:31 PM
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@SaneIT  I've mentioned this in other places. I really thing that Bradbury's vision comes closest to where we currently are. In some ways, we are even worse off because we carry our alternative reality with us wherever we go. He only envisioned screens mounted in place -- not mobile ones.

Re: Brighter Future
  • 5/12/2017 8:48:15 AM
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I hope we can avoid the Brave New World model but I do question if we'll end up going a more 1984 or Fahrenheit 451 accidently by letting AI take over.  The models aren't hard to imagine if you had an AI trying to keep people in line and operating in what it sees as the good of all people. 

Brighter Future
  • 5/11/2017 8:07:54 PM
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Brave New World alludes to a novel about a future where people are drugged, enjoy violence and don't know about families.

I expect we'll use AI and machine learning to find a better future than that one! Certainly hope so...

Re: Brave new world
  • 5/11/2017 6:35:25 PM
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@tomsg I couldn't find a book with that exact title. Did you mean How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World? That's by Steven Johnson who also wroteWhere Good Ideas Come FromThe Invention of AirThe Ghost MapEverything Bad Is Good for YouMind Wide OpenEmergence, and Interface Culture

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